63. Earthling

Written and directed by independent filmmaker Clay Liford, Earthling explores the life of Judith (Rebecca Spence), a high school English teacher who slowly discovers she is an alien after she has a severe seizure and crashes her car.  It is no coincidence that there was a catastrophe at the international space station when 2 astronauts mysteriously die at the same time and an infected astronaut (Matt Socia) returns to earth with a little more than he left with.

After one of Judith’s burnout students named Abby (Amelia Turner) propositions her for an outing of flirting and pot smoking at the lake, she begins to piece together her flashbacks and figure out who exactly she is and where she comes from.  After Judith’s father (Harry Goaz!!!!) offers her no answers, she discovers she is not alone in the community as an alien and must come to terms with her own existence-and whether or not she will return to her former home.  As Judith unravels her past, she makes shocking discoveries about herself and the relationships she has forgotten.

Personally I am not a huge science fiction fan, but Earthling fortunately spends more time examining the human side of internal conflict and relationships instead of succumbing to most of the pitfalls like other countless alien films like Species, and The Village.  Some of the special effects feel a bit corny at times and the plot twists felt contrived-but I do appreciate this fresh take on a challenging genre.  I was very impressed with Rebecca Spence in the lead role, as she ended up carrying much of the film by herself depicting a desperate and confused soul nearing the end of her rope.  Clay Liford undoubtedly assembled an enjoyable cast and a solid effort overall.  It had a good beat and I could bug out to it.

3.5 stars out of 5

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Categories: 100 Films

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  1. Deputy Andy Brennan’s Greatest Hits | brad d studios - January 27, 2012

    [...] independent films as of late such as Deadroom and Saint Nick, as well as the new Clay Liford film Earthing, available now on iTunes! Like this:LikeBe the first to like this [...]

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